Films and TV shows featuring students

One of the four strands of our research focuses on analysing the ways in which students are constructed in the media in our six case study countries (England, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Poland, Spain). We will be analysing newspaper articles and also popular TV shows and films that feature higher education students in a prominent manner.

We are keen to put together a resource of relevant TV shows and films – for our own benefit, but hopefully it will be of use to others as well. Paul Greatrix has done a good job identifying some sources, that will be familiar to a UK audience, including a dozen which he thinks it’s best to avoid. However, we hope to include media from other European countries in our list.

If you have some suggestions, please do get in touch with us. We’ll compile all the nominated films and TV shows into one list, which we’ll post here in due course (and thank all those who have contributed). Many thanks!

Welcome to the research team

We are very pleased that all members of the EuroStudents research team have now started work on the project. Here are some brief introductions to the researchers….

Jessie Abrahams is one of the post-doctoral research fellows on the project, working in particular on the student understandings strand. She is in the final stages of an ESRC-funded PhD at Cardiff University looking at the way in which the English secondary education system reproduces social class inequalities through its structures and practices. Prior to this, Jessie was a research assistant on the Leverhulme Trust-funded Paired Peers Project exploring the experiences of students from different social class backgrounds at the University of Bristol and UWE Bristol.

Predrag Lažetić is also a post-doctoral fellow on the project and he is responsible for the institutional perspectives strand of research. He is the final stages of his PhD work at the University of Bath investigating the institutional regime differences in the quality of jobs higher education graduates undertake in different European countries. Prior to this post he worked as the director of the Centre for Education Policy in Belgrade and as a researcher in the International Centre for Higher Education Research in Kassel, Germany, specialising in both posts in higher education research.

Anu Lainio is a postgraduate researcher on the project and is leading the media representations strand of work. Anu did her first master’s in education in University of Tampere. She studied her second master’s in Erasmus Mundus programme on Lifelong Learning: Policy and Management in Aarhus University (Copenhagen) and Deusto University (Bilbao). Anu also has a several years working experience in higher education administration and in international relations. Her research interests are in internationalisation of higher education, mobility, social justice and equality.

Launch seminar – final programme

We’re really looking forward to the seminar to launch the EuroStudents project, which will be held next Wednesday at the University of Surrey. The final programme is posted below. If you aren’t able to come along, but would like to take part in the discussions, do follow the seminar on Twitter. We’ll be using the hashtag #HEstudents.

UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEMPORARY HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENT

Wednesday, 21st September 2016, University of Surrey, LTJ, Lecture Theatre Block

FINAL PROGRAMME

09.30-10.00: Coffee and registration

10.00-10.15: Welcome and overview of the ‘EuroStudents’ project, Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey

10.15-11.15: Keynote presentation: LTJ (Chair: Rachel Brooks)

Student Experience in Context: higher education policy and the changing value of university education, Michael Tomlinson, University of Southampton

11.15-11.30: Break

11.30-13.00: Parallel sessions

Session A: LTJ (Chair: Johanna Waters)

Spatial and social (im)mobilities through higher education,             Michael Donnelly, University of Bath

Students in cities – the everyday mobilities of contemporary UK students, Mark Holton, Plymouth University and Kirsty Finn, Lancaster University

‘Talent-spotting’? Inequality, cultural sorting and constructions of the ideal employable graduate, Nicola Ingram, Lancaster University and Kim Allen, University of Leeds

Session B: LTF (Chair: Steve Woodfield)

Her majesty the student: marketised higher education and the narcissistic (dis)satisfactions of the student-consumer, Elizabeth Nixon, Richard Scullion and Robert Hearn, University of Nottingham

The student-as-consumer versus the student-as-learner: some preliminary findings from the UK, Stefanie Sonnenberg, University of Portsmouth

Understanding the student experience, Rachel Spacey, University of Lincoln

13.00-14.00: Lunch

14.00-15.30: Parallel sessions

Session C: LTJ (Chair: Kim Allen)

Unreasonable rage, disobedient dissent: the social construction of student activists through media and institutional discourses in the United Kingdom, Jessica Gagnon, University of Portsmouth

‘It’s always a good decision to go to University because if you don’t you’ll end up becoming a cleaner or a supermarket worker’, Jessie Abrahams, University of Surrey/Cardiff University

The changing nature of students’ unions; young people as political actors?, Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey

Session D: LTF (Chair: Alex Seal)

How institutional doxa can shape choice within higher education, Jon Rainford, Staffordshire University

Contemporary students’ rights: a discursive strategy to overcome hysteresis in a post-92 HE setting, Karl Baker-Green and Cinnamon Bennett, Sheffield Hallam University

Paradoxes of the academisation process: a sociological exploration of the history of foreign and classical language education since 1864, Eric Lybeck, University of Exeter

15.30-15.45: Break

15.45-16.45: Keynote presentation: LTJ (Chair: Jessie Abrahams)

Biopolitics and the ‘making’ of the unexceptional student: some geographical reflections on education in East Asia, Johanna Waters, University of Oxford

16.45-17.00     Concluding comments

 

 

 

 

Launch seminar – second keynote address

We are delighted that Johanna Waters, associate professor of human geography at the University of Oxford, will be giving the second keynote address at our launch seminar on 21 September. The abstract of her talk is given below.

Biopolitics and the ‘making’ of the unexceptional student: some geographical reflections on education in East Asia

This paper deals directly with the question of how contemporary students are ‘made’, with a focus on biopolitical processes.  In East Asia, children’s education has variously been described as an ‘imperative’, as a ‘fever’ and an ‘obsession’ amongst the populace. It is given a status, arguably, that is unsurpassed in any other geographical context. Specific technologies, that include high profile public examinations, serve to create particular subject identities, separating the successful from the unsuccessful student. These student identities have far-reaching and potentially profound implications; individuals are often perceived of as having failed ‘morally’ as well as ‘academically’. In this paper, I consider what options are available for individuals who have ‘failed’ to access higher education in the conventional way, drawing on research from two projects that have explored different aspects of students’ spatial (im)mobilities in/from Hong Kong. In one scenario, failing students ‘exit’ the system altogether and seek HE overseas; in another, students obtain HE through continuing education colleges and subsequently pursue ‘non-local’ degree programmes. In both cases, students are able somehow to disrupt the biopolitical production of ‘local’ student identities, offering, in the process, a form of political resistance to dominant ‘meritocratic’ ideologies.

Launch Seminar – abstract for keynote address

We are very pleased that Michael Tomlinson, of the University of Southampton, will be giving one of the two keynote addresses at our launch seminar on 21st September. Michael’s talk will be entitled Student Experience in Context: higher education policy and the changing value of university education and we have pasted the abstract below.

‘This presentation will provide an overview of current trends and developments in higher education and their implications for student experience. The paper explores a variety of contextual and structural changes within and around higher education, including: massification, the move towards market-driven policy, the changing economic context for graduates and the continued socio-cultural divisions within the student population. The presentation will explore some of the main policy frameworks in place in UK higher education, their antecedents and potential consequences. One of the subtexts to recent HE policy has been the framing of contemporary students as rational choice-markers, consumers and self-disciplining agents who should hold their institutions to greater account. Recent policy frameworks have explicitly framed the value of higher education in almost exclusively utilitarian and performative terms (i.e. ‘value for money’, employability development etc). Drawing upon the speaker’s and other researchers’ critical insights in this field, the paper will consider some of the impacts of these changes have on student experience and the different ways in which students are positioned, and position themselves, in HE. This will include the contentious problem of the student-as-consumer and the way in which the value of higher education is framed.’

If you would like to join us on the 21st, for a day of stimulating papers, do register for a place here.

Seminar programme

UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEMPORARY HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENT: ONE-DAY SEMINAR

Wednesday, 21st September 2016; University of Surrey, LTJ, Lecture Theatre Block

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

09.30-10.00, Registration

10.00-10.15, Welcome and overview of the ‘EuroStudents’ project: Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey

10.15-11.15, Keynote presentation: Michael Tomlinson, University of Southampton

Student Experience in Context: higher education policy and the changing value of university education

11.15-11.30, Break

11.30-13.00, Parallel sessions

Session A: LTJ

Spatial and social (im)mobilities through higher education: Michael Donnelly, University of Bath

Students in cities – the everyday mobilities of contemporary UK students: Mark Holton, Plymouth University and Kirsty Finn, Lancaster University

‘Talent-spotting’? Inequality, cultural sorting and constructions of the ideal employable graduate: Nicola Ingram, Lancaster University and Kim Allen, University of Leeds

Session B: LTF

Her majesty the student: marketised higher education and the narcissistic (dis)satisfactions of the student-consumer: Elizabeth Nixon, Richard Scullion and Robert Hearn, University of Nottingham

The student-as-consumer versus the student-as-learner: some preliminary findings from the UK: Stefanie Sonnenberg, University of Portsmouth

Understanding the student experience: Rachel Spacey and Mary Stuart, University of Lincoln

13.00-14.00, Lunch

14.00-15.30, Parallel sessions

Session C: LTJ

Unreasonable rage, disobedient dissent: the social construction of student activists through media and institutional discourses in the United Kingdom: Jessica Gagnon, University of Portsmouth

‘I am completely uninterested in politics’: ‘Filial nationalism’ and ‘rational patriotism’ as mainland Chinese students’ political orientations in Hong Kong: Cora Lingling Xu, University of Cambridge

Understanding the contemporary HE student: ‘It’s like a bubble. You just get sucked in’: Grace Sykes, Northampton University

Session D: LTF

How institutional doxa an shape choice within higher education: Jon Rainford, Staffordshire University

Contemporary students’ rights: a discursive strategy to overcome hysteresis in a post-92 HE setting: Karl Baker-Green and Cinnamon Bennett, Sheffield Hallam University

Paradoxes of the academisation process: a sociological exploration of the history of foreign and classical language education since 1864: Eric Lybeck, University of Exeter

15.30-15.45, Break

15.45-16.45, Keynote presentation: Johanna Waters, University of Oxford 

Biopolitics and the ‘making’ of the unexceptional student: some geographical reflections on education in East Asia

16.45-17.00, Concluding comments

To attend the seminar, please register here. (There is a small charge of £30.)

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Two research fellow posts

Post-doctoral Research Fellows (2 positions – both are 5 year posts, starting on 1st August 2016)

Salary: up to £33,574 per year

The Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey invites applications for two research fellows to join the five-year ‘EuroStudents’ project, funded by the European Research Council (see here for further details). The project will explore the different ways in which higher education students are constructed across six European nations.

The first research fellow post will be responsible for the strand of work that focuses on institutional perspectives, i.e. the ways in which the higher education student is constructed through official university texts and staff understandings. S/he will be required to: liaise with relevant gatekeepers to secure access to research sites across six European countries; analyse websites and other public documents produced by universities (using both qualitative and quantitative methods); conduct and analyse interviews with members of university staff; and contribute to the analysis of data and dissemination of findings from the project as a whole.

The second post will be responsible for the strand of work that focuses on student perspectives. S/he will be required to: liaise with relevant gatekeepers to secure access to research sites across six European countries; conduct focus groups with students in three universities in each of the six countries; and contribute to the analysis of data and dissemination of findings from the project as a whole.

The successful candidates will have a doctorate in a relevant topic area, and experience of using relevant research methods. They will also have excellent organisation and communication skills and, ideally, knowledge of one or more of the languages covered by the project (in addition to English): Danish, German, Polish and Spanish. A willingness to travel abroad for a substantial proportion of the fieldwork is essential.

For informal inquiries contact Rachel Brooks: r.brooks@surrey.ac.uk

Closing date: 5pm, 6th June 2016

Interviews: 20th June 2016

Start date: 1st August 2016 (or as soon as possible thereafter)

Further details about the first post and the online application form can be found here, and details and the application form for the second post can be found here. (Please do apply for both posts, if you are interested in both.)

 

PhD studentship

Media Representations of Higher Education Students: a cross-national comparison

Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Surrey

The Department of Sociology invites applications for a PhD studentship on ‘Media Representations of Higher Education Students’. This forms part of a wider project (called ‘EuroStudents’) funded by the European Research Council, which will explore the different ways in which higher education students are constructed across six European nations.

The PhD studentship comprises two strands of work. Firstly, representations of students within newspapers in the six countries will be analysed. A content analysis will be conducted for two national newspapers from each of the countries involved in the research (Denmark, England, Germany, Ireland, Poland and Spain). A broadly representative sub-sample of texts will then be chosen for further, detailed discursive analysis. In the second strand, two popular film or drama-based television programmes that feature students will be selected from each country and analysed using a discursive approach. Comparisons will be made within each country, across all six countries, and then in relation to the results of the analysis of news media.

The successful candidate will be part of the EuroStudents research team and also the vibrant research community within the Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey. Further information about the research project can be found here.

Funding

The 3-year studentship is funded by the European Research Council. It covers Home/EU tuition fees and a maintenance grant of £14,057 per annum.

Entry requirements

Essential:

Masters level degree in Sociology, Education, Media, Human Geography or a related subject

Experience of media analysis

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Desirable:

Knowledge of issues related to higher education

Knowledge of one of more languages covered by the project, in addition to English (i.e. Danish, German, Polish, Spanish)

Familiarity with one or more of the countries outside the UK involved in the research (i.e. Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Poland, Spain)

Applications

To apply, please send:

1. A covering letter highlighting: (i) why you are interested in this particular research project; (ii) why you are interested in doing a PhD; (iii) which specific skills and aptitudes you feel you would bring to the project.

2. A copy of your current CV including the names of two referees and the marks you have received for your master’s modules to date. (Please feel free to include a transcript of your marks, alongside your CV, if this is easier.)

3. A sample of your academic writing (e.g. an essay or dissertation).

These should be sent by email to Rachel Brooks: r.brooks@surrey.ac.uk Please also contact Rachel for any queries you may have associated with this studentship.

Closing date: 5pm, 27th May 2016

Interview date: to be confirmed

Start date: 26th September 2016

 

Launch seminar

UNDERSTANDING THE CONTEMPORARY HIGHER EDUCATION STUDENT 

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR ONE-DAY SEMINAR

Wednesday, 21st September 2016, University of Surrey

Keynote speakers: Anna Mountford-Zimdars (King’s College London) and Michael Tomlinson (University of Southampton)

There is some evidence that, at least within countries with neo-liberal welfare regimes, students are constructed largely as consumers with contemporary policy texts. However, there is less consensus about whether or not students have taken up such an identity. Some scholars have assumed that this construction of student-as-consumer is having a profound effect on how students themselves approach HE. Indeed, Molesworth et al. (2009) contend that the inculcation of a consumer identity has brought about a more passive approach to learning, in which students place much more emphasis on their rights rather than their responsibilities, and on having a degree rather than being a learner. Others have, however, argued that, despite the increasing recourse to the language of economics in policy documents (in which students are positioned as consumers and universities as providers), in practice, the behaviour of students does not conform to this model (Dodds, 2011; Williams, 2013). Moreover, research has suggested that such identities may be differentiated by socio-economic characteristics, with only more affluent groups having the capacity to ‘shop around’, unencumbered by financial concerns or the ‘identity risks’ of moving away from home.

This one-day seminar will provide an opportunity to explore our current understandings of the contemporary higher education student, and the extent to which they are shaped by, for example, policymakers, the media, higher education staff and students themselves. Papers may focus on one or more of the following: the impact of tuition fees on understandings of what it means to be a student; students as consumers; media representations of students; students as political actors; policymakers’ understandings of students; and cross-national comparisons. However, other topics, relevant to the seminar theme, are also welcome.

Abstract Submission: Please send abstracts of up to 250 words by 13th May 2016 to Rachel Brooks at the University of Surrey: r.brooks@surrey.ac.uk. (There will be a small charge of £30 for attending the seminar.) You can book a place here.

Seminar Organisers: The seminar is organised by Rachel Brooks and colleagues in the Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey. It will help to launch the five-year ‘EuroStudents’ research project based at Surrey, which investigates understandings of the higher education student across six different European countries.

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Keynote speakers for launch seminar

The seminar to launch the EuroStudents project will take place on Wednesday, 21st September at the University of Surrey. We will be posting details about this soon, along with a call for papers.

We are very pleased to have two great keynote speakers for the event: Anna Mountford-Zimdars, from King’s College London and Michael Tomlinson, from the University of Southampton.

Both have undertaken research in areas very relevant to the EuroStudents project. Anna has recently published a book on Meritocracy and the University, which provides a comparative analysis of higher education admissions in the US and UK, while Michael’s research has included a study of the impact of recent policy changes on student attitudes to learning in higher education.